November 07, 2017

Have You Taken the National Pet Health Survey?

The One Health Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency are asking pet owners for their help in completing a survey to assess pet health trends across the country.
By Kerry Lengyel
The One Health discussion has grown louder and louder as more medical professionals gain a better grasp on the connection between humans, animals, and the environment.

Now, the One Health Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are working together on a National Pet Health Survey that aims to continue that conversation.

The main objective of the new survey is to assess geographic patterns in diseases and health issues for residential cats and dogs in the United States. By discovering disease hotspots and pet health trends across the country, the survey will shed light on emerging pet health issues.

Voluntary input from pet owners who access the survey is being collected until January 2020, or until 300,000 pet owners have filled out the survey.

The data will then be summarized and integrated into the EPA’s EnviroAtlas interactive mapping tool, which offers full public access to information about a host of ecosystem services.

How It Works
If you’re a cat or dog owner interested in participating in this national survey, visit the survey website and read through the instructions.

The 26-question survey should only take about 6 minutes to complete, and survey questions should only be answered about one pet at a time. People with multiple pets have the option to complete separate surveys for each pets.

In addition to questions about where you live, the survey asks about topics ranging from the type of food and water pets eat and drink to where they spend their time to treatments they have received in the past year to diseases they have had in their lifetime.

The goal for the National Pet Health Survey to generate one of the largest health and disease databases for dogs and cats across the United States.

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